Man who posts online vid of kitten abuse gets year in prison

Online cat videos have come to be associated with some of the cutest, silliest moments the Internet has to offer. But they can have a dark side too, as a legal sentence handed down in France Monday shows.

A veterinarian holds Oscar the kitten, who was injured when thrown repeatedly against a building. The perpetrator then posted the video to his Facebook profile.

(Credit: Stringer/AFP/Getty Images)

Farid Ghilas of Marseille was sentenced to a year in prison for of animal cruelty after posting a video to his Facebook profile last week showing him repeatedly hurling a kitten against a building. The video quickly went viral, sparking widespread horror and outrage and even death threats to the perpetrator.

By the time Ghilas took the video down, Facebook users had copied and pasted his profile information; posted his name, address, and phone number on the Web; and created Facebook pages calling for his arrest. The police ended up taking Ghilas into custody less than 24 hours after the video appeared online.

On Monday, just days later, some 200 animal-rights activists, accompanied by about 20 dogs, gathered outside a Marseille criminal court as the 24-year-old man was sentenced on charges of “acts of cruelty against a domestic and tame animal.” The offense carries a maximum prison term of two years and a fine of 30,000 euros (about $ 40,500).

Acc… [Read more]

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Crave: gorgeous gadgets and other crushworthy stuff. – CNET

Man who posts online vid of kitten abuse gets year in prison

Online cat videos have come to be associated with some of the cutest, silliest moments the Internet has to offer. But they can have a dark side too, as a legal sentence handed down in France Monday shows.

A veterinarian holds Oscar the kitten, who was injured when thrown repeatedly against a building. The perpetrator then posted the video to his Facebook profile.

(Credit: Stringer/AFP/Getty Images)

Farid Ghilas of Marseille was sentenced to a year in prison for of animal cruelty after posting a video to his Facebook profile last week showing him repeatedly hurling a kitten against a building. The video quickly went viral, sparking widespread horror and outrage and even death threats to the perpetrator.

By the time Ghilas took the video down, Facebook users had copied and pasted his profile information; posted his name, address, and phone number on the Web; and created Facebook pages calling for his arrest. The police ended up taking Ghilas into custody less than 24 hours after the video appeared online.

On Monday, just days later, some 200 animal-rights activists, accompanied by about 20 dogs, gathered outside a Marseille criminal court as the 24-year-old man was sentenced on charges of “acts of cruelty against a domestic and tame animal.” The offense carries a maximum prison term of two years and a fine of 30,000 euros (about $ 40,500).

Acc… [Read more]

Related Links:
How Israel and Hamas weaponized social media
Man pulls real, cute kitten out of computer
Paper and the craft of securing Facebook’s future
Scientist: Cats think you are just a big, stupid cat
With Paper, Facebook campaigns for coolness

    




Crave: gorgeous gadgets and other crushworthy stuff. – CNET

10 reasons why you should ignore tech posts that begin with ’10 reasons why’

(Credit: !0PointlessThings/YouTube Screenshot by Chris Matyszczyk/CNET)

1. There are rarely 10 reasons for anything. Sometimes, there are only two or three. These involve ego, need for love and conformism. But other times, there are very many. There might be 5 reasons why you should buy a Nexus 7. Or only one. Some might think there are 8 reasons why an Xbox One will get them through the holiday season. There are, though, 423 reasons why Microsoft Word will, in the end, drive you crazy.

2. When you start out knowing you have to find 10 reasons for something, how many of those are likely to be even remotely correct? Hitting .300 as a listicle writer is harder than for your average slugger.

3. If there was anything magical, revolutionary or even vaguely persuasive about offering 10 reasons why something, Apple’s slick marketers would have launched the iPad with “10 reasons why you should buy the iPad.” Instead, they showed the product and played some music.

4. Look at your favorite gadget. Were there really 10 reasons why you decided to buy it? Or was it just because 10 people you know have one?

More Technically Incorrect

In half-baked phone theft, thief slips, posts pot shot of self on victim’s Facebook page

This, police say, is the alleged cell phone thief.

(Credit: Public Information, Deputy Commissioner)

Evidence can be a menace.

You think you’ve gotten away with something, and then that moment comes along when you suddenly remember that perhaps you’ve left a clue.

This thought may (or may not) have crossed the mind of an alleged cell phone thief.

As the New York Post reports, police in the Bronx feel sure that what happened is that a certain man — whose picture they now have — robbed a 27-year-old woman of her gadget.

More Technically Incorrect

‘Street Ghosts’ posts Street View specters in real life

A Google Street View shot taken at 12 Cheshire Street in London (right), alongside Paolo Cirio’s re-creation of it.

(Credit: Paolo Cirio/Google )

Imagine turning a street corner and coming face-to-face with… yourself?

It could happen, if you’ve ever been captured by the Google Street View cameras. For his Street Ghosts project, artist Paolo Cirio prints human-scale pictures of people found on Street View and posts them where the shots were originally taken, thus placing the digital imagery firmly in the physical world.

“In this project, I exposed the specters of Google’s eternal realm of private, misappropriated data: the bodies of people captured by Google’s Street View cameras, whose ghostly, virtual presence I marked in Street Art fashion at the precise spot in the real world where they were photographed,” says the Italian artist, a fellow at New York’s Eyebeam Art+Technology Center who is particularly interested in exploring the flow of mediated information.

Cirio prints his low-resolution colored Street Ghosts posters on thin paper, cuts along the outline, and affixes them to the walls of public buildings. So far, he has posted images in New … [Read more]

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Crave: gorgeous gadgets and other crushworthy stuff. – CNET